Author Archives: Smilie G. Rogers

About Smilie G. Rogers

Smilie is an elder law, estate planning, probate, and tax attorney at Brennan & Rogers, PLLC, with offices in York and Kennebunk, Maine. See www.brennanrogers.com. Licensed to practice law in Maine, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire and licensed, but inactive, in Virginia. Smilie is also the founder of New England Estate Planning, see www.newenglandestateplanning.com, a fledgling website with the stated purpose of sharing legal knowledge and know-how, including automated forms, with and among estate planning lawyers.

Clio is great but have you considered Actionstep?

I have been a Clio user for about 6 years but recently made the switch to Actionstep.  http://www.actionstep.com.  The move has been expensive, relatively, both in terms of cost and time, but we think in the long term the investment … Continue reading

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Electronic Wills Act – New Hampshire Senate Bill SB40 Scheduled for Hearing

  SENATE BILL 40 AN ACT relative to electronic wills. SPONSORS: Sen. Bradley, Dist 3; Sen. Innis, Dist 24; Sen. Carson, Dist 14; Sen. Woodburn, Dist 1; Sen. D’Allesandro, Dist 20; Rep. Hunt, Ches. 11; Rep. Danielson, Hills. 7; Rep. … Continue reading

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Is Providing Successor Trustees with Guidance Beneficial?

I have never seen a trust drafted by another lawyer that attempted to provide guidance to a successor trustee but I have seem many successor trustees operating in the complete dark for years.  Often the result is the failure to … Continue reading

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Revised Additional Instructions for Advance Health Care Directives

Sometime ago now I blogged about the importance of empowering clients to prepare additional instructions regarding their wishes that go beyond what traditional boilerplate Advance Health Care Directives and/or Living Wills provisions.   Recently I undertook a significant revision of my … Continue reading

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Are we there yet?

       Planning takes time.  Meaningful planning requires vigilance, doesn’t it?  How do you as an estate planner maintain vigilance?  Assuming the client wanted to patriciate, how would you meaningfully accomplish this?   Would it be cost effective for the client?  Would it be cost effective for … Continue reading

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Wills and Long Term Care Planning

  When retirement assets are in play, planning for long term care concerns under a Will based plan can get complex.  Sometimes visualizing the interplay between different planning strategies is helpful. LTC and Will PlanningLTC and Will Planning

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What does the Operating Agreement Say?

We interrupt our normal broadcasting to rebroadcast this interesting case law news flash!  Can the provisions of an LLC Agreement avoid probate? Can it act as a Will substitute?  What does the Operating Agreement Say?  Courtesy of Alan Gassman and Chelsea … Continue reading

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Staying on Top of the Day

Staying on top of the day in a law practice can be difficult.  There are always a number of tasks to attend to.  I use a number of tools to try to manage my daily approach to practice as you … Continue reading

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Thinking, Fast and Slow – By Daniel Kahneman

Thinking, Fast and Slow – By Daniel Kahneman (Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics winner for his development of prospect theory along with Amos Tversky) should be required reading in every law school. It has been out for several years, so … Continue reading

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Recommended Reading for Estate Planners (and their Clients)

Many estate planning and elder law blogs have recommended this book and for good reason.   I think it stands a good chance of changing the way estate planners think about their clients  (not to mention how doctors think about their patients) and … Continue reading

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